Top Headlines

How To Retire Without Sucker Yields

1h seekingalpha
I want to discuss the intelligent way for retirees to structure their portfolio. There are a few good options. However, there is also one terrible option. I want to begin by addressing the terrible option. Occasionally, I hear from investors demanding 14% or even 16% annual returns from their portfolio. They don’t demand it because it is a reasonable goal. They demand it because that is the level required to sustain their retirement. (943-1)
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Why Tech Still Looks So Attractive

3h seekingalpha
ETFs, favorites of small investors, have seen investors shy away from tech even as it has led the market up. (631-0)
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Top Analyst Upgrades and Downgrades: AEP, Bank of America, Citigroup, Equinix, JD.com, Ralph Lauren, Sensata and More

51m 247wallst
Stocks have hit all-time highs, but the markets were looking for direction on Wednesday ahead of an almost certain Federal Reserve interest rate hike. The trend that continues to prevail is for investors to buy all the big market sell-offs. That trend has worked for all of 2017 and most of the past five years. Investors also are looking for new investing and trading ideas to generate gains and income ahead. (241-1)
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If You Took On More Risk

1h seekingalpha
The first two portfolios we presented in our "investing with a helmet" service, Bulletproof Investing, generated modest returns. Here we consider how taking on more risk could have raised returns. (267-0)
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The Market Is About Individual Stocks - Cramer's Mad Money (12/12/17)

2h seekingalpha
Stocks discussed on the in-depth session of Jim Cramer's Mad Money TV Program, Tuesday, December 12. (296-0)
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Stock Screens

Finds all companies with an activist investor filing in the last year  
Companies with Return on Invested Capital (ROIC) > 15%  
For investors desiring income over capital appreciation, companies that pay dividends regularly are a great way to generate a steady cash flow. As in any purchase, the goal is to get most value for your dollar, and with dividends, a key metric is dividend yield. The dividend yield is the annual dividend paid divided by the current share price. Higher yields are better. This stock screen finds all securities with a dividend yield greater than 4%.  
The Net Current Asset Value (NCAV) is a conservative valuation metric popularized by Benjamin Graham. To calculate it, simply subtract the total liabilities from a company’s current assets. To calculate NCAVPS (Net Current Asset Value Per Share), divide the NCAV by the number outstanding shares. This stock screener takes Ben Graham’s more conservative approach and uses ⅔ of the NCAV.  
This stock screen finds microcap companies with positive annual revenue.  
This is Benjamin Graham's Net Net Working Capital Screen  
Companies with negative enterprise value generally get this way because they have a lot of cash. (Cash is subtracted when calculating EV). There is some evidence that negative enterprise value companies outperform the market, so companies matching this screen might be undervalued.  
Finds companies where Price to Book Value < 1.0;  
The fundamental task in investing is finding mispricings in price v. quality. There are a lot of cheap companies in the market, but most of them are cheap for very good reasons. The trick is finding companies that are cheap but actually healthy. In 2000, Joseph Piotroski wrote a paper in which he described a mathematical model that turned data from financial reports into a simple 9-point score that described a company’s health. He showed that this score, combined with a valuation metric (he used Book-To-Market), could be used successfully to produce excess returns in an investing strategy. This stock screener finds all companies with a score greater than six (which we call “healthy enough”). In his work, he suggested taking a list like this and buying the cheapest of that list. Note that many people believe, incorrectly, that buying companies with the best score is the proper approach, but they end up overpaying for quality. Remember, the goal is to find mispricings in price and quality, not overpay for high quality.